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Category Direction - GitLab Handbook

GitLab Handbook

Stage Maturity Content Last Reviewed
Create Complete 2020-07-23

Overview

The GitLab Handbook is the single source of truth for how we operate at GitLab, including processes, policies, and product direction. In keeping with our value of transparency, the GitLab Handbook is entirely open to the world. We welcome feedback from the community and hope that it serves as inspiration for other current or future companies. The GitLab Handbook is also an incredible recruiting tool, providing candidates with valuable insight into how GitLab runs as a company.

A sub-section of the about.gitlab.com website, the GitLab Handbook specifically refers to content that is in the /handbook/ namespace of the website. The overall user experience and architecture of the GitLab Handbook is maintained by the Static Site Editor team.

Target Audience

GitLab Team Members: Every GitLab team member is responsible for using and updating our handbook. It is the central repository for process documentation and product direction.

Leadership: GitLab leadership uses the handbook like any other member of the team, but additionally needs to reference the content during presentations to stakeholders or investors. Since everything we do is open to the public, members of leadership teams outside of GitLab may also use the GitLab Handbook as reference or inspiration for their own team processes and policies.

Potential Applicants: Candidates for job opportunities at GitLab use the handbook to learn more about expectations for the role, compensation and benefits, GitLab's company values, and other policies. GitLab team members also use the handbook extensively to share specific, relevant information with potential applicants, making it a powerful recruiting tool in itself.

Current and Potential Users: GitLab's product direction, strategy, and vision are documented in the handbook alongside our product and engineering processes. This allows current users a glimpse into GitLab's future priorities and can help potential users make an informed decision related to adopting GitLab as a tool.

Where we are Headed

At GitLab, we encourage everyone to work handbook first in order to promote asynchronous collaboration and documentation. Working this way has its challenges, not the least of which is the time and effort involved in making a change. While this extra investment can encourage contributors to be more considered and deliberate with their changes, at a certain point it discourages meaningful collaboration and works against our goals.

Making a change to the GitLab Handbook requires either building and running the site locally or using the Web IDE, both of which can be intimidating for less technical users. Once a change has been made, the current build process for the GitLab Handbook makes it difficult to predict when a change will be deployed, often taking between 10 and 45 minutes.

Our hope is that the GitLab Handbook is something that others want to emulate. To facilitate that, we are investigating ways we can templatize the handbook itself and make it something that any user can install at a group level. To get there, we need to have:

What's Next & Why

What is Not Planned Right Now

We are not currently investigating a transition to a separate, external content management system or publishing platform.

The needs of the GitLab Handbook have outgrown what can be handled in a wiki (or similar) product, so we are not planning to migrate any content into that format.

Since the content is changing quite literally every day, we are not looking to generate a digital or printed book from the GitLab Handbook content.

The GitLab Handbook is not currently optimized for serving as a searchable Knowledge Base or FAQ repository similar to what you would find on Quora or Stack Overflow. The problems to be solved in those areas are likely to be addressed by the Knowledge group.

Maturity Plan

Currently, the GitLab Handbook category is a non-marketing category which means its maturity does not get tracked. However, for the sake of measuring improvement, the GitLab Handbook is marked as Complete with intentions of moving it to Lovable.

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