Support Handbook

Welcome to the GitLab Support Handbook

Looking for technical support? Please visit the Support Page instead.


On this page


Support Direction

The overall direction for Support in 2018 is set by our overall strategic objectives, with a particular emphasis on continued improvement of (Premium) Customer satisfaction. As can also be inferred from our publicly visible OKR page, the effort focuses on the following elements.

Triaging Support Effort

By triaging support effort through internal SLAs and integration of SalesForce, Zuora, and Zendesk, the team can improve the support experience for Premium customers while still addressing the questions of all subscribers.

Increase Capacity & Develop Experts

In 2016 and 2017 we expanded the support team significantly, and this trend will continue in 2018. Along the way, the Support team developed internal training tools to assist in rapid, robust, self-guided training for any team member. As GitLab – the product – continues to expand, so will the skill and knowledge of all Support Engineers to be able to continue providing an excellent customer support experience.

Know someone who might be a great fit for our team? Please refer them to the Support Engineer job description.

Actionable Analytics

Better reporting on ticket metrics (topic, response times, product it relates to, etc.) will help guide the Support Team's priorities in terms of adding to the greatest documentation needs, bug fixes, and support processes.


What if I Feel Threatened or Harassed While Handling a Support Request?

Just as Support Staff are expected to adhere to the Code of Conduct, we also expect customers to treat the Support Staff with the same level of respect.

If you receive threatening or hostile emails from a user, please create a confidential issue in the GitLab Support Issue Tracker and include:

  1. A history of the user's communication
  2. Relevant links
  3. Summary of the high-level issues

Include the your Manager, Director of Support, and Chief Culture Officer in this issue. Together we will evaluate on a case-by-case basis whether to take action (e.g. ban the user from the forums for violating the Code of Conduct).

Our Meetings

Support has 3 meetings a week. Tuesday APAC Support call which will cover Metrics/Demos/Open format questions. Tuesday AMER call, which is focused on Demos and solving challenging tickets as a group. Lastly, the Friday AMER call which is focused on metrics/open format questions. This is how we coordinate and help us all grow together.

Support Ops

Please see Support Ops.

Additional Resources for the Support Team

Breach Hawks

Breach hawks are members of the support team who help the rest of the team keep an eye out for nearly-breaching tickets, so that they can be responded to in a timely manner. Of course, any and all members of the Support Team will have a sense of how many tickets are close to breaching and how high the load is on any given day. But it can happen that you're deep into a ticket, a customer call, etc., unaware of the impending doom. That's where breach hawks come in: they tackle their tickets, but they also keep an eye out for the team at large and can call in the Support Turbos when needed.

Support Turbo

Every now and then, it may occur that we come close to breaching our SLAs. To prevent an actual breach from occurring, the Support team can call on the help of several "Support Turbo" developers who are denoted on the Team Page.

Support Turbos are separate from the "fix4all" rotation, in that Turbos are on an as-needed basis while the fix4all rotation is a week-long commitment per person. Anyone within the support team can call Turbos when there is a need for it. Turbos should be called by pinging specific people via Slack. If you are in doubt who is available, you can use @turbos, but this may lead to a bystander effect.

The support team calls for help when necessary via Slack. Support Turbos should treat requests to solve breaching tickets with high priority. If a Turbo is working on something that cannot wait (e.g. security release, critical regressions, direction issues with near deadlines), the Turbo should ensure that someone else fields the request for Turbos by checking with the development lead or VP of Engineering.

Further guidelines when rolling up your sleeves to do Turbo work:

Contacting Support

Internal Support for GitLab team members

Fellow GitLab team members can reach out for help from the Support Team in various ways:

  1. For normal support questions ("Can GitLab do x?", "How do I do y with GitLab?") try:
    • pose your question on the #questions channel in Slack, so that everyone can contribute to an answer. If you're not getting an answer, try pinging the group handle for the support team, but be aware that this pings everyone in the team.
  2. For longer term or larger scope questions, such a process change, or data gathering requests, create a support issue
  3. If customers or users have questions, advise them to contact support directly via the support web form.
  4. As a last resort, ping the support team on the support chat channel.

Support Issue Tracker

The Support project hosts an issue tracker meant to improve our workflow by reporting any problems that may arise in our tools or processes. It's also meant to propose and discuss ideas in general.

The issue tracker is open to the community and part of the GitLab.com group. It should not contain any sensitive information. Links to Zendesk or other references are encouraged.

Support Chat Channels

We use our chat internally as a realtime communication tool. The support channels are as follows:

In order to attract support team's attention in Slack, you can use the team handles, mentioning multiple team members in a message or a thread where support is needed. Support team handles are:

Support Resources